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Scoliosis Research Society
SRS: Scoliosis Research Society

Scoliosis Research Society

Dedicated to the optimal care of patients with spinal deformity

SRS Sets a Research Agenda that Will Chart Path for Spine-Related Studies for the Next Five Years

The field of spine research and treatment has evolved over the more than 50-year existence of the Scoliosis Research Society. Society members have for decades contributed to the progress in technique and understanding in the field. 

Recently, during the 56th Annual Meeting of the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS), held in St. Louis, MO, USA, members announced the first ever SRS Research Agenda.  

The agenda is the culmination of several months of audit, investigations, and interviews with not only members but also 15 external partners, other spinal societies, and study groups, including funding partners.  

“For the first time in its history, the SRS has created a list of its research priorities aimed at improving the care of patients with spinal deformities,” said Doug Burton, MD, chair of the SRS Research Council.  

The agenda includes 14 topics covering everything from global screening program for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and long-term outcomes of pediatric and adolescent spinal deformity to non-operative treatment of Adult spinal deformity and pediatric and young Adult high grade spondylolisthesis. 

As the premier global platform for sharing and disseminating new knowledge of spinal deformity, the SRS is the leading society of experts to create and support research. Setting this research agenda supports the overall SRS research mission to enhance the creation of meaningful discoveries for all patients with spinal deformity.

“The Research Agenda is a comprehensive array of unanswered questions to help us understand the causes of scoliosis, the best ways to treat patients without surgery, and if surgery is needed, how to do it in the least invasive way possible while preserving the maximal amount of spinal motion,” said Burton. “This applies to our youngest and oldest patients around the world.”